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Ski Season is here


Skiing and Snowboarding are popular recreational activities in our area with such ease of

access. Unfortunately the thrill of the slopes can often lead to injuries, but we want to keep

you on the slopes!


Here are some tips to reduce your risk of injury…


Use appropriate and good quality equipment

  • Wear a helmet! Research has shown helmets can reduce the risk of head injury by 35%

  • Make sure your bindings are set according to your height and weight. There is an increased risk of knee injuries when the ski bindings don’t release during a fall.

Work at your level and take lessons if you are a beginner

  • Beginners are at a higher risk of injury

  • Learn how to fall safely as most injuries occur with falls.

Engage with injury prevention exercises specific to your sport

  • The most common injury for skiers is the knee and for snowboarders it is the arm, predominantly the wrist.

Here are a few examples of exercises to complete at home or the gym to help keep you on the slopes!



Lateral jumps Planks Stability squats Lunges Bird dogs


There are lots of variations and different levels of exercise that is appropriate for the gym or at home. Make sure you are targeting your legs, core, balance.



What should you do if you get an injury?

  • Rest for a short period of time

  • Avoid any aggravating activities, but keep moving!

  • If it does not settle within a few days contact a physiotherapist who can set up an assessment


What types of winter sport injuries do Physiotherapists treat?

We treat all types of musculoskeletal injuries, some of the common injuries we see over the winter are;

  • knee injuries,

  • wrist injuries,

  • thumb injuries,

  • low back injuries,

  • shoulder injuries,

  • fractures,

  • concussions,

  • and many more.


Please reach out to us if you have any questions at all!



Resources:

LJ Warda, NL Yanchar; Canadian Paediatric Society, Injury Prevention Committee - Skiing and snowboarding injury prevention


New Zealand Snow Sports Injury Trends Over Five Winter Seasons 2010–2014 Brenda A. Costa-Scorse, Will G. Hopkins, John Cronin, and Eadric Bressel


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